Here and Now

Monday-Thursday 1pm-3pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

A live production of NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening in the middle of the day, with timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, the show’s daily lineup includes interviews with NPR reporters, editors and bloggers, as well as leading newsmakers, innovators and artists from across the U.S. and around the globe.

Ways to Connect

A potentially unprecedented conflict is unfolding in Pennsylvania’s state House of Representatives. After allegations of abuse, one Republican lawmaker has been granted a restraining order against another.

But WITF’s Katie Meyer reports the accused representative is still allowed in the state Capitol.

Ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft have had a noticeable effect on parking, especially at airports and stadiums.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Mary Smith, senior vice president at Walker Consultants, about the extent of the impact and what it means for the future.

United Airlines is apologizing after a dog died on one of its flights after an attendant reportedly forced the dog’s owner to keep the dog in an overhead bin for a flight.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what happened.

Washington may soon become the first state to restrict a certain kind of chemicals found in products from food wrappers to fire-fighting foams. The chemicals are used because they’re non-stick and flame-resistant — but they’ve also been associated with liver problems, weakened immune systems and certain kinds of cancer.

EarthFix’s Eilís O’Neill (@eilis_oneill) reports.

How To Recognize And Overcome Your Biases

Mar 13, 2018

Almost every day, there’s at least one story in the news that involves racism, sexism or another kind of bigotry. But when you hear those stories, do you think, “Well, that’s not me”? Turns out, even among the best-intentioned people, unconscious biases can exist.

So how can we identify these biases, and is it possible to overcome them?