Iraqi authorities have moved a group of more than 1,300 foreign women and children — the family members of suspected ISIS fighters — and a refugee agency is raising the alarm about their precarious situation and the specter of retribution.

"The families had been held in a camp in Kurdish-controlled territory while Iraq figures out what to do with them," NPR's Jane Arraf reports.

A year ago, Washington D.C.'s Capital Area Food Bank — one of the largest in the country — decided to turn away junk food, joining a growing trend of food banks that are trying to offer healthier options to low-income Americans. From soda to chips, the CAFB has reduced the junk food it supplies to its 444 nonprofit partners, including soup kitchens and food pantries, by 84 percent.

Protests in St. Louis over a former police officer's acquittal in the shooting death of a black man continued Monday after a weekend capped by the arrests of more than 80 people.

St. Martin, St. Thomas and Tortola’s ports have all been closed indefinitely to cruise liners. What does this mean for passengers as the winter season approaches?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with cruise analyst Andrew Coggins, a management professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, about this hurricane season’s impact on the industry.

Four decades ago, evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins published a book that changed science. In “The Selfish Gene,” Dawkins argued that genes competing for survival not only drive evolution but also animal and human behavior. It was an abstract idea at first, but now scientists, including researchers at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City, are figuring out how selfish genes actually do their work.

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